Tag Archives: funny

Youtube partners find unexpected profits

Brian Stetler wrote about Michael Buckley and his now famous Youtube videos “What the Buck?” in a piece for The New York Times back in 2008 . Buckley was one of the first to monetize his videos on Youtube by becoming a “partner” and now he made enough money off his videos on entertainment news and celebrity gossip to quit his day job at a public access station. As Buckley learned, making popular Youtube videos once you’re popular (that’s the hard part) is a full-time job.

Just ask EpicMealTime, now famous (all their videos have at least 1 million views) for creating monstrous gastronomical feats like the Breakfast Eggroll, Tex Mex Lasagna and Meatzza.

Did someone say bacon strips?

The group of friends started off simply with a video of stacking all their favorite fast food on top of a pizza. More ridiculously hilarious than healthy (or even edible?), the video became extremely popular and viewers even started to send in suggestions for the group. Now their videos have ads and they even have a merchandise site for fans who want to buy a t-shirt with their famous motto “BACON STRIPS AND BACON STRIPS AND BACON STRIPS”. If you haven’t heard of them before, check out their videos featuring the hand-crafted bacon weaves and the Jack Daniel’s they work in to various recipes.

Hannah Hart: "Butter? I barely know her!"

Another accidental Youtube star I’m a fan of is Jenna Marbles, who’s first video that went viral was “How to trick people into thinking you’re good looking.” Jenna Marbles (real name Jenna Mourey) is a former go-go dancer and blogger at defunct stoollala (a sister site of Barstool sports) who now has over 2.7 million subscribers on her main channel and about half a million subscribers to her personal vlog channel. Although she just moved to California for a new job, she continues to put out new, humorous videos every Wednesday with the help of her dogs Kermit and Mr. Marbles. She now takes requests from fans, stays updated with a twitter, and has even featured on other Youtubers videos, like My Drunk Kitchen (run by Hannah Hart, another accidental Youtube star who now makes regular videos). Both Jenna Marbles and My Drunk Kitchen, where Hannah Hart literally just films herself cooking while intoxicated (with hilarious results) also now have ads for revenue from their videos and merchandise. Who needs a “real” job when you’ve got millions of adoring fans on the internet who will watch anything you make and buy anything with your jokes on it?

Jenna Marbles: "Chili-face noodle-punch!"

Not only do these few examples give me hope for Youtube stars that want to produce great, original content just as someone who has a Youtube channel like myself, but they also give me hope as a comedian. The world of comedy is different than even 10 years ago. Some of the best talent on TV, movies, an on-stage these days comes from the internet and sites like Youtube. Youtube is the new resume for funny and talented people trying to sell their work to agents. There’s not much room to hide with simple camera equipment, a microphone, and usually minimal editing. The old rules of comedy no longer apply. On the internet, where the democracy votes who is the best with its “likes” and subscriptions, funny and original content is key. Luckily, these people and channels I subscribe to are making some money now and don’t have to sacrifice the quality of their videos. Youtube, Vimeo and sites like it need to adapt to suit content creators like these because not every actor or comedian will plan on being popular- but when the internet speaks, the entertainment industry should listen.

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I can has my cheezburger and eat it too

I was happy to see an article about I can has cheezburger  recently in Business Week. I knew about the site years ago, probably in middle school. It was back in the day where internet nerds like myself could communicate in the new language of LOLCAT speak, as invented by founder Eric Nakagawa. In a way, Nakagawa practically invented the modern meme. A meme is a reoccurring joke/image/saying online, that users share to communicate specific feelings or inside jokes about things. Examples include rage comics, trolling, nyan cat:

and characters to relate to like the Socially Awkward Penguin:

His site is successful not only because it’s so funny, but because people are allowed to share jokes and submit their own to the blog. It became participatory and easy. Anyone can upload a picture of their pet and put a funny caption on it to share with friends.

See, I made my own just now:

I love sloths. No joke.

While his website may have been started as a joke without the intention of growing so much, it has. Cheezburger, as it’s now shortened to, now owns various other hilarious websites. If you visit the original site, you will see links to Know Your Meme (a website dedicated to just explaining memes), The Daily What (a popular new short-form news and entertainment blog that I personally read every day), Failblog and more. These sites were all strong and popular on the web independently, but are even stronger linked to Cheezburger in a collective community. According to the aforementioned article,  “Cheezburger now gets 500,000 page views a day from between 100,000 and 200,000 unique visitors”, which is also great traffic for partner sites. And with all the best sites in one place, why would internet users go anywhere else?

Another great element about I can has cheezburger, that it has also passed onto The Daily What, is posting at key times of the day. Posts in the morning, during lunch breaks, and in the evening, make sure readers don’t feel too far behind on the blog — whether it’s funny cats or serious news. The Daily What calls its first post “the Early Bird Special of the Day”, often followed at some time by the “This X That of the Day” with categories of links titled “Read This”, “Look at this” and “Know this.” The “OMG! Adorbz! of the Day” is the random post with something cute to cheer readers up. But the site isn’t all giggles. The Daily What also covers “Hate Crime Investigation of the Day” (the “of the day” title is used loosely) and the site is often known for calling out media and internet gaffs. There’s no faster way to critique and correct incorrect stories or call out people on lies than on a blog. TDW jumps on stories, updates them quickly if changes are made, and keeps its following by reporting honestly and ethically. This is an excerpt from an interview I did with creator Neetzan Zimmerman last year:

“I believe accuracy in news is more important now than ever. There is a rush to get content up as soon as possible, and often times accuracy is sacrificed in the name of celebrity,” said Zimmerman.

Zimmerman, a professional full-time blogger, strives for accuracy in his blog, which constantly competes with other news blogs and the new trend of dissemination of information through social media.

            “With Twitter taking over as the main source of news reporting for many fast-paced stories such as the popular uprisings in the Middle East, sifting through the rumors to find the truth is fast becoming a very arduous task. Unfortunately, at a time when people need to be increasingly vigilant in their information intake, they are, for a variety of reasons, becoming increasingly negligent in discerning between fact and fiction,” said Zimmerman.

Neetzan and Zimmerman’s success gives me hope that someday I can also create a successful blog. People are creating new genres through independent media sources and filling niches that people didn’t know needed to be filled. These two examples have gone about creating and monetizing their blogs very successfully, though they had no idea how far their audience would reach. New journalists and people with great ideas can learn from these movers and shakers so that they may also have cheezburgers one day.

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